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Chords: ex 1-8

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The slides

How to slide guitar?

Slide guitar without bottleneck

Not to be confused with the Bottleneck (“neck“) which requires the use of an accessory. A slide guitar is therefore more of a transition gesture between 2 notes. These 2 notes will therefore be linked to the sound level, there will be no sound cutoff between these 2 notes. There are two ways to play them. Either we play a note with the pick, then we slide to the next note. either the note already resonates, then we slide directly onto the next note without touching the pick again. Be careful to continue to press while you move, otherwise your notes will no longer resonate and when you reach the note, nothing will happen. This technique also applies to chords. You can move from one chord to another by making a slide.
This technique can also be found in a grace note.

Slide guitar technique

Slides allow you to connect two or more notes smoothly and quickly, and change position on the fretboard more fluidly. They bring notes to life and lend a vocal quality to your plans. The slide is an essential technique for rhythm playing and lead playing. As the name suggests, a slide is produced by choosing a fretted note and sliding your fretted finger up or down the string, maintaining contact with it, to arrive at a new note on another fret. When the destination fret is reached, this new note is played.

Effective guitar slide

To produce an effective slide, constant pressure on the string is necessary along the entire length of the slide. A slide can be as short as a single fret or as long as the entire length of the fretboard. Slides can also be done with chords. Glides are indicated by an ascending or descending diagonal line connecting notes in notation or numbers in tablature. The letters “sl.” can also be written above.

How to perform a slide guitar?

Successful slides are all about touch. When you first pick up the string, fret the note as you normally do. As soon as you begin your slide, release your fret finger slightly so that it slides quickly and effortlessly across the frets to the next note. If you press too hard, your finger won't slide; if you don't press hard enough, you won't create the sliding sound. Once you have reached the desired note, reapply pressure with your fingertip, otherwise the target note will not sound. Below are some basic variations of the slide technique:

The slide guitar of two connected notes

A coulant (curved line indicating the notes that must be articulated either by a hammer-on, a pull-off or a slide) accompanied by a diagonal line indicates a legato slide. This means you take the first note and then slide to the second without taking the second note. This slide can be performed in an upward or downward manner.
Let's try it: Play the note on the first string, ninth fret. Hold the note for one beat, then on the second beat, while the string is still sounding, quickly slide your finger from the fretted hand up to the twelfth fret, maintaining full finger pressure the entire time. This will make the note sound at the twelfth fret without you picking it up.

The slide guitar connecting two notes.

To play slides that are notated with a diagonal line but without flowing, you take both the first and second notes. Again, this type of slide can be performed in an upward or downward manner. Play and hold the ninth fret note of the first string for a beat. Then, on the second beat, slide up to the twelfth fret and strike the string with the pick just as you get to the twelfth fret.

Slide into a slide guitar

This slide does not connect two different notes, but rather slides toward a note from an undefined point, usually a few frets lower, in the same way a baseball player slides toward home plate. This is a quick slide that is heard as one note, not two. It is not rhythmic and only serves to decorate your target note. This slide is noted as a dash preceding a note. What you want to do when you start this type of sliding is to start moving your hand in the direction of your target note before you start pressing down on the strings.

Departure from slide guitar

Start the slide from two or three frets below your target note. Using the first string, ninth fret note as the target note, and using minimal finger pressure, strike the string with the pick while your finger of the fretted hand is moving, somewhere between the starting frets and the target (the sixth and ninth frets, in this example). As your finger slides upward, gradually increase the pressure on your finger so that when you get to the target fret (the ninth fret), you are exerting full pressure.

Slipping out of a slide guitar

The opposite of sliding into a slide is sliding out of a slide. After holding a note for its duration, simply slide the finger of the fretted hand along the fingerboard toward the nut and lift it up after a few frets. This slide is noted as a dash following a note. Using the first string, ninth fret note, pick up the string in the normal way. After letting the note sound for the indicated duration, slide your finger of the fretted hand along the string, gradually releasing finger pressure as you go, to cause a crossfade effect. After a few frets, remove your finger completely from the string.

Single note: ex 1-8

Prerequisites:

Log in or create an account to access the prerequisites.

Downloads:

Log in or create an account to access the prerequisites.

The slides

How to slide guitar?

Slide guitar without bottleneck

Not to be confused with the Bottleneck (“neck“) which requires the use of an accessory. A slide guitar is therefore more of a transition gesture between 2 notes. These 2 notes will therefore be linked to the sound level, there will be no sound cutoff between these 2 notes. There are two ways to play them. Either we play a note with the pick, then we slide to the next note. either the note already resonates, then we slide directly onto the next note without touching the pick again. Be careful to continue to press while you move, otherwise your notes will no longer resonate and when you reach the note, nothing will happen. This technique also applies to chords. You can move from one chord to another by making a slide.
This technique can also be found in a grace note.

Slide guitar technique

Slides allow you to connect two or more notes smoothly and quickly, and change position on the fretboard more fluidly. They bring notes to life and lend a vocal quality to your plans. The slide is an essential technique for rhythm playing and lead playing. As the name suggests, a slide is produced by choosing a fretted note and sliding your fretted finger up or down the string, maintaining contact with it, to arrive at a new note on another fret. When the destination fret is reached, this new note is played.

Effective guitar slide

To produce an effective slide, constant pressure on the string is necessary along the entire length of the slide. A slide can be as short as a single fret or as long as the entire length of the fretboard. Slides can also be done with chords. Glides are indicated by an ascending or descending diagonal line connecting notes in notation or numbers in tablature. The letters “sl.” can also be written above.

How to perform a slide guitar?

Successful slides are all about touch. When you first pick up the string, fret the note as you normally do. As soon as you begin your slide, release your fret finger slightly so that it slides quickly and effortlessly across the frets to the next note. If you press too hard, your finger won't slide; if you don't press hard enough, you won't create the sliding sound. Once you have reached the desired note, reapply pressure with your fingertip, otherwise the target note will not sound. Below are some basic variations of the slide technique:

The slide guitar of two connected notes

A coulant (curved line indicating the notes that must be articulated either by a hammer-on, a pull-off or a slide) accompanied by a diagonal line indicates a legato slide. This means you take the first note and then slide to the second without taking the second note. This slide can be performed in an upward or downward manner.
Let's try it: Play the note on the first string, ninth fret. Hold the note for one beat, then on the second beat, while the string is still sounding, quickly slide your finger from the fretted hand up to the twelfth fret, maintaining full finger pressure the entire time. This will make the note sound at the twelfth fret without you picking it up.

The slide guitar connecting two notes.

To play slides that are notated with a diagonal line but without flowing, you take both the first and second notes. Again, this type of slide can be performed in an upward or downward manner. Play and hold the ninth fret note of the first string for a beat. Then, on the second beat, slide up to the twelfth fret and strike the string with the pick just as you get to the twelfth fret.

Slide into a slide guitar

This slide does not connect two different notes, but rather slides toward a note from an undefined point, usually a few frets lower, in the same way a baseball player slides toward home plate. This is a quick slide that is heard as one note, not two. It is not rhythmic and only serves to decorate your target note. This slide is noted as a dash preceding a note. What you want to do when you start this type of sliding is to start moving your hand in the direction of your target note before you start pressing down on the strings.

Departure from slide guitar

Start the slide from two or three frets below your target note. Using the first string, ninth fret note as the target note, and using minimal finger pressure, strike the string with the pick while your finger of the fretted hand is moving, somewhere between the starting frets and the target (the sixth and ninth frets, in this example). As your finger slides upward, gradually increase the pressure on your finger so that when you get to the target fret (the ninth fret), you are exerting full pressure.

Slipping out of a slide guitar

The opposite of sliding into a slide is sliding out of a slide. After holding a note for its duration, simply slide the finger of the fretted hand along the fingerboard toward the nut and lift it up after a few frets. This slide is noted as a dash following a note. Using the first string, ninth fret note, pick up the string in the normal way. After letting the note sound for the indicated duration, slide your finger of the fretted hand along the string, gradually releasing finger pressure as you go, to cause a crossfade effect. After a few frets, remove your finger completely from the string.